Photo firsts (Steven, Kayleigh, Dan, Marina, William), photo stats

It’s the end of April, so life’s photojournal and stats pages have been updated.

I’ve added five new people to stats this time around, from a lot of different places in my life. Yay variety?

First photo of William:

February 18, 2006 at the SCS Talent Show.

First photo of Kayleigh:

August 8, 2011 at our apartment.

First photo of Dan:

April 16, 2011 in the UC eating free donuts from buggy.

First photo of Marina:

April 17, 2010 in the UC (in very edge of the photo).

First photo of Steven:

June 27, 2008 at the 154 Release Party in Golden Gate Park.

I also haven’t updated camera stats in a while, and I’ve gotten a new camera (my iPod Touch) since then. Photoshop Album reports 425,113 photos, so we’ve also hit our 425,000 photo milestone. This is an unusual confluence of my every-4-month people stat days and every-25,000-photo camera stat days, but so it goes.

Here’s the 425,000th photo, taken on April 29, 2017:

This is David, Jim, and Kathleen just before we did the Imaginarium’s escape room.

Speaking of the escape room, we did an escape room on Saturday. It went really well… apparently we set a new record or something?

(I think that’s the remaining time in our hour… we had a 30 minute warning at one point.)

Here’s individual camera stats, including all cameras for comparison

Intel Pocket PC camera October 6, 2000 – September 18, 2003 1077 days; 2.95 years 15,829 photos $200 14.7 photos per day 1.26¢ per photo
Olympus C3000 Zoom September 28, 2001 – December 5, 2003 798 days; 2.186 years 10,647 photos $450 13.3 photos per day 4.23¢ per photo
Kodak Easyshare DX6490 December 8, 2003 – March 17, 2006 830 days; 2.274 years 49,413 photos $500 59.5 photos per day 1.01¢ per photo
Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 105,067 photos $570 78.8 photos per day 0.54¢ per photo
+$250 repair cost 0.78¢ per photo
106,916 shutter releases $570 80.15 shutter releases per day 0.533¢ per shutter release
+$250 repair cost 0.77¢ per shutter release
Samsung SL30 July 27, 2009 – December 1, 2016 2684 days; 7.35 years 21,616 photos $70 8.05 photos per day 0.32¢ per photo
Nikon D90
(Current)
February 26, 2010 – April 29, 2017 2619 days; 7.17 years 204,568 photos $780 78.11 photos per day 0.38¢ per photo
275,693 shutter releases 105.27 shutter releases per day 0.28¢ per shutter release
iPhone 5 June 23, 2013 – December 23, 2014 548 days; 1.5 years 130 photos $0
(Provided by work)
0.24 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
149 shutter releases 0.27 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
iPhone 6 Plus
(Current)
January 8, 2015 – April 15, 2017 828 days; 2.27 years 3398 photos $0
(Provided by work)
4.10 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
11,070 shutter releases 13.37 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
Nikon D7100
(Current)
December 2, 2015 – April 30, 2017 515 days; 1.41 years 12,064 photos $620 22.98 photos per day 5.14¢ per photo
27,297 shutter releases 53.00 shutter releases per day 2.27¢ per shutter release
iPod Touch 6
(Current)
December 2, 2017 – April 30, 2017 216 days; 0.59 years 2265 photos $160 10.49 photos per day 7.06¢ per photo
23,385 shutter releases 108.26 shutter releases per day 0.68¢ per shutter release

Looks like I’m getting even better at discarding photos. The fact that I’ve not had to buy a new hard drive in a while, despite the larger filesizes of my new camera, is testament to that.
I’m particularly amused by the fact that I keep less than 10% of the photos from my iPod. This is perhaps not too surprising given how many of them come out blurry, but it’s nice to see that in actual numbers.

Here are the dates on which I took each 25,000th photo as well as the number of days between each 25,000th photo.

25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000 150,000
January 12, 2004 October 20, 2004 April 10, 2006 April 20, 2007 December 4, 2007 February 7, 2009
282 days 537 days 375 days 228 days 431 days
150,000 175,000 200,000 225,000 250,000 275,000
February 7, 2009 July 4, 2009 April 14, 2010 September 4, 2010 June 23, 2011 December 23, 2011
147 days 284 days 143 days 292 days 183 days
275,000 300,000 325,000 350,000 375,000 400,000
December 23, 2011 August 24, 2012 June 2, 2013 February 17, 2014 March 21, 2015 November 13, 2015
245 days 282 days 260 days 397 days 237 days
400,000 425,000
November 13, 2015 April 29, 2017
533 days

And the usual graphs… Number of photos taken by month, log scale y-axis:

Same thing but with a linear y-axis (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):


I like how there’s always a spike around Carnival time. I guess that’s when everyone comes back and buggy and food and event things happen.

Total number of photos taken through time (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):

And amount of time between 1000 photos (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU, so it starts at 131,000):

Posty McPostface, camera stats

You may remember the (failed) chronicles of Boaty McBoatface and its subsequent use for one of the ship’s subs instead.

Apparently Google just released Parsey McParseface today, and Racist McShootface is bidding on some guns.

This makes me happy. Happy McHappyface?

In other unrelated things, GSA Softball has started up for the year, which means lots of nice opportunities for me to get my sports photography on.



It’s been about half a year since I’ve done photo stats, and I’ve gotten a new camera since then. Photoshop album now reports 408319 tagged photos through yesterday (May 12).

Here’s individual camera stats, including all cameras for comparison

Intel Pocket PC camera October 6, 2000 – September 18, 2003 1077 days; 2.95 years 15,829 photos $200 14.7 photos per day 1.26¢ per photo
Olympus C3000 Zoom September 28, 2001 – December 5, 2003 798 days; 2.186 years 10,647 photos $450 13.3 photos per day 4.23¢ per photo
Kodak Easyshare DX6490 December 8, 2003 – March 17, 2006 830 days; 2.274 years 49,413 photos $500 59.5 photos per day 1.01¢ per photo
Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 105,067 photos $570 78.8 photos per day 0.54¢ per photo
+$250 repair cost 0.78¢ per photo
106,916 shutter releases $570 80.15 shutter releases per day 0.533¢ per shutter release
+$250 repair cost 0.77¢ per shutter release
Samsung SL30
(Current)
July 27, 2009 – May 11, 2016 2480 days; 6.79 years 20,879 photos $70 8.42 photos per day 0.34¢ per photo
Nikon D90
(Current)
February 26, 2010 – May 12, 2016 2267 days; 6.21 years 200,264 photos $780 88.34 photos per day 0.39¢ per photo
260,614 shutter releases 114.96 shutter releases per day 0.30¢ per shutter release
iPhone 5 June 23, 2013 – December 23, 2014 548 days; 1.5 years 130 photos $0
(Provided by work)
0.24 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
149 shutter releases 0.27 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
iPhone 6 Plus
(Current)
January 8, 2015 – April 7, 2016 455 days; 1.25 years 2652 photos $0
(Provided by work)
5.83 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
7218 shutter releases 15.86 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
Nikon D7100
(Current)
December 2, 2015 – May 8, 2016 158 days; 0.43 years 3258 photos $620 20.62 photos per day 19.03¢ per photo
5431 shutter releases 34.37 shutter releases per day 11.42¢ per shutter release

It’s worth noting that, even though the D90 has 7863 more shutter releases than the last stats, I’ve only kept 3725 of those photos (~47%), which means I’m editing down photos much more heavily than I used to. Similarly for my new D7100, where I only keep ~60% of the photos I take with it.
I also only keep ~37% of the photos I take with my work iPhone. (A lot of this is probably due to picture quality… since my photos with it tend to come out blurry, I usually spam the shutter button when I’m using it, and delete the junk later.)
For contrast, I kept more than 98% of the photos I took with my D50.
This is good, both for looking through photos later, and also for hard drive space.

No graphs for now… more graphs probably when I hit 425,000 photos.

Life is good :)

400k photos and electrical woes

This past Friday was a fun milestone: I broke 400,000 photos tagged in Photoshop Album — Album is reporting 400,307 photos tagged through today.

Here are the dates on which I took each 25,000th photo as well as the number of days between each 25,000th photo.

25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000 150,000
January 12, 2004 October 20, 2004 April 10, 2006 April 20, 2007 December 4, 2007 February 7, 2009
282 days 537 days 375 days 228 days 431 days
150,000 175,000 200,000 225,000 250,000 275,000
February 7, 2009 July 4, 2009 April 14, 2010 September 4, 2010 June 23, 2011 December 23, 2011
147 days 284 days 143 days 292 days 183 days
275,000 300,000 325,000 350,000 375,000 400,000
December 23, 2011 August 24, 2012 June 2, 2013 February 17, 2014 March 21, 2015 November 13, 2015
245 days 282 days 260 days 397 days 237 days

Here’s updated stats for my two cameras. I now also use my work iPhone for photos sporadically, but those numbers are not represented here. Perhaps I should pull those in next time I do a stats post.

Samsung SL30 July 27, 2009 – October 1, 2015 2257 days; 6.18 years 20,772 photos $70 9.2 photos per day 0.34¢ per photo
Nikon D90 February 26, 2010 – November 15, 2015 2088 days; 5.72 years 196,539 photos $780 94.13 photos per day 0.40¢ per photo
252,751 shutter releases 121.05 shutter releases per day 0.31¢ per shutter release

And the usual graphs… Number of photos taken by month, log scale y-axis:

Same thing but with a linear y-axis (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):

Total number of photos taken through time (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):

And amount of time between 1000 photos (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU, so it starts at 131,000):

Here’s the 400,000th (tagged) photo. It’s our electrician getting a wire through the ceiling so we can replace the second-floor panel with a better one.

Which (finally) brings me to the fun we’ve been having with our house.

One of the things the inspection for the house (before we bought it) brought up was the lack of grounded outlets, and general knob-and-tube wiring, on the second floor of the house. Obviously, since I work from home with computers, and we have 6 computers between us, it was pretty important to get this remedied. We got quotes from quite a few electricians, and eventually settled on Patco Electric, as Pat was very thorough and also friendly and easy to get along with.

He comes Thursday to start the work, and things proceed reasonably.

Once the knob-and-tube wiring is out and the panel disconnected, we run into a minor snag upon discovering that the first floor’s living room light, foyer light, and porch light are also fed from the second floor. Not too terrible though… easily fixed by running a wire down from the second floor. (We were pulling up the floors anyway to avoid cutting holes in the plaster walls, so pulling up a few more boards wasn’t an issue.)

Friday, the work continues, and I took the day off work to sit in the house and be available in case things go wrong. The first part of the day proceeds awesomely… they successfully fish the new main wire to the second floor through the first floor closet and into the basement, then through the (finished) basement ceiling and around most of the room to get it into the panel.

It took a couple of tries, and eventually required cutting a hole in the ceiling as the fish stick was able to get through but the thicker cable wasn’t — cutting revealed that the stick was passing through a ~1cm gap between beams that the cable couldn’t have. But that was fine, and the rest of the work proceeded mostly as expected.


The problem came up when they turned the power back on to the second floor. The ceiling light fixtures in three of the four rooms didn’t come back on, even though they hadn’t previously turned off when cutting the knob and tube power. Cue lots of searching by the electricians. A few hours later, it turns out the previous electricians had done some mess of wiring — the ceiling lights have a hot wire coming from somewhere else (probably the third floor), but their neutral line was going through the second floor knob-and-tube wiring. This basically meant they were not shut off via the second-floor circuit breaker, but were dependent on it to complete the circuit, so its removal meant they no longer worked.

The electrician is coming back next weekend to rewrire those lights as well, but yeah… yay for horrible previous people doing horrible things. I guess that’s what we get for buying such an old house. :P

Saturday was a nice break from things, and we spent the day at William’s house where David was having an “experimental music birthday party”. For us non-musical people, it was mostly hanging out and talking, which was interesting anyway. Here’s a fun photo of Vincent in Wiliam’s basement stairwell.

I have an urge now to shoot people in bright clothing against a white background (maybe with board game components?), blow out the saturation for effect, and then print and frame these photos for the game room or something. Perhaps a project like that will happen at some point.

Photo stats galore

Today is a special day, because it’s the day when I’ve been taking digital photos for half my life. To celebrate the occasion, life has been updated, and also here’s a ton of different photo stats. :D

First off, some numbers (updated from here). I currently have 360,233 photos tagged in Photoshop Organizer.

Here are the dates on which I took each 25,000th photo as well as the number of days between each 25,000th photo.

25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000 150,000
January 12, 2004 October 20, 2004 April 10, 2006 April 20, 2007 December 4, 2007 February 7, 2009
282 days 537 days 375 days 228 days 431 days
150,000 175,000 200,000 225,000 250,000 275,000
February 7, 2009 July 4, 2009 April 14, 2010 September 4, 2010 June 23, 2011 December 23, 2011
147 days 284 days 143 days 292 days 183 days
275,000 300,000 325,000 350,000
December 23, 2011 August 24, 2012 June 2, 2013 February 17, 2014
245 days 282 days 260 days

Here’s updated stats for my two cameras, plus the D50 (for comparison with the shutter counts below):

Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 105,067 photos $570 (+$250 repair cost) 78.8 photos per day 0.54¢ per photo (0.78¢ per photo including repair cost)
Samsung SL30 July 27, 2009 – June 13, 2014 1782 days; 4.88 years 20,266 photos $70 13.5 photos per day 0.345¢ per photo
Nikon D90 February 26, 2010 – June 27, 2014 1582 days; 4.33 years 158,801 photos $780 100.38 photos per day 0.49¢ per photo

I found out recently that the EXIF data of photos includes how many shutter releases the camera has made, which is more accurate since I delete many photos I take now. I also found the information for my old D50. Unfortunately my crappy SL30 does not track that data (and the filenames aren’t much help; the first photo is SDC16333.JPG, the most recent is SDC17918.JPG). My Kodak DX6490 also does not store that information (which isn’t entirely unsurprising).
(The D50 seems to store shutter releases as an unsigned 16-bit int, so it wraps around after 65535, so I had to do some maths. The 65535th photo was j4cbo at the Haight-Ashbury Fair on June 8, 2008.)

Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 106,916 shutter releases $570 (+$250 repair cost) 80.15 shutter releases per day 0.533¢ per shutter release (0.77¢ per shutter release including repair cost)
Nikon D90 February 26, 2010 – June 27, 2014 1582 days; 4.33 years 197,675 shutter releases $780 124.95 shutter releases per day 0.39¢ per shutter release

I guess the lesson there is that I delete many more photos now than I used to. It would have been interesting to have numbers for the SL30, since I feel like I delete a lot of those shots given how many come out crappy.

Costco prints 4×6 prints for 13¢ each. To print all 360,233 photos would cost $46,830.29. Also, at a weight of ~2 ounces per photo, the entire stack would weigh 45,029 pounds, or 22.5 tons.

Also here’s some updated graphs.

Number of photos taken by month, log scale y-axis:

Same thing but with a linear y-axis (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):

Total number of photos taken through time (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU):

And amount of time between 1000 photos (second graph only includes time after graduation from CMU, so it starts at 131,000):

Movies, photos, People Wars, work

In the past few years, I’ve only seen a couple movies in theatres: Frozen this past February with Austin, Yubin, and Max; and The Lego Movie this past March with my dad when I was in Phoenix.
It’s interesting then that I’ve seen both of these movies again in McConomy: Frozen with the rest of the in-town Fairfax group over Carnival weekend, and The Lego Movie tonight with Greg when we were out of ideas of what to do and decided to see whatever movie was showing at CMU.
They’re both really well-done films made for kids but enjoyable by adults. So that’s kind of awesome. I keep thinking I should buy Frozen in Thai when it comes out on DVD. I already enjoy looping the Thai version of Let It Go while I work.

In any case, life has been really uneventful lately. Due to whatever reason, I’ve been taking far fewer photos than usual. A quick check reveals that I only have 318 photos since the end of Carnival (since April 14), which represent a total of 619 shutter releases.
So it’s both interesting how much I edit down what photos to keep now (a huge difference from in high school and college when I would just dump my memory card and keep everything), and how few photos I’ve been taking (619 photos used to represent a single day of photos for me).
A lot of the editing is because tagging photos has grown to be a chore. It’s super useful to have tags to be able to find photos by person or event or location, sure… but having to manually do all that for every photo I keep is rather frustrating. This is probably a good thing for my hard drive consumption anyway.

I think it would be interesting to stop carrying my big camera around all the time. I do so now half out of a sense of fear of not having a camera with me for that one big thing or some important moment I want to capture. And it’s also kind of neat to have photos of mundane everyday life. But my little camera is sufficient for that… and after all, I survived for several months (after the death of my D50) with only the little camera. We shall see.

Work has started on the next People Wars expansion, Hijinks. It’s themed around Climbing characters and Route cards, which enhance task playing and scoring.
I’m worried about maybe having overbalanced the game toward tasks given all of the task-centric cards entering the game recently (and given that I haven’t actually played a game with cards past the Exchanges expansion)… but it kind of feels like attack decks have it so much easier that tasks should be getting boosts. Who knows.





Work has been rather interesting lately. The other senior dev on the team recently left Salesforce, leaving the role of senior team member once again solely on my shoulders. Between that and a bunch of planned vacations from other developers, there are days when I’m the only developer working, and we’re probably down to about 2/3 of our previous productivity. Which will mean interesting things given the jam-packed plans for the upcoming release.
I guess time is showing me to be a terrible leader and coordinator, especially given how I already know I do badly under stress (or, rather, I will get the shit done, but I’ll feel like shit the entire time while doing it and hate my life).
We’re hiring a new senior developer for the team, who will hopefully be able to ramp up and help handle a lot of the knowledge, planning, and design work (which right now I think is falling mostly to me). But until then, onward as best I can.
It’s just frustrating though when a lot of time is being eaten up by bugs and questions and emails. I pulled a task last last Tuesday (the 15th) with the intention of starting it the next day. But between bugs and other things, I ended up not having time to do anything on it until this past Thursday (the 24th).
Let’s hope that’s not a sign of things to come in the coming months.