Photo Stats (Pandemic Edition)

I took the last week off work and mostly spent it in a cabin in the middle of Blue Knob State Park, disconnected from the internet and the world. And it was really, really nice, especially given we hadn’t really been anywhere but home since early March.

In any case, photos still aren’t really happening, but it’s been almost two years since the last photo stats compilation, so I figured I’d do one even though I haven’t hit the next 25k milestone (475,000) yet (only at 470,682). October 2020 is also my 20th year of taking digital photos, so it’s also somewhat appropriate to do now.

As always, first is the (full) table of photos by camera. My Work iPhone has pretty much become my primary camera now because it’s more convenient to carry. I also haven’t used my D90 since I last went rock climbing (in November 2018, before the last stats), so I’m going to mark it as retired for now.

Intel Pocket PC camera October 6, 2000 – September 18, 2003 1077 days; 2.95 years 15,829 photos $200 14.7 photos per day 1.26¢ per photo
Olympus C3000 Zoom September 28, 2001 – December 5, 2003 798 days; 2.186 years 10,647 photos $450 13.3 photos per day 4.23¢ per photo
Kodak Easyshare DX6490 December 8, 2003 – March 17, 2006 830 days; 2.274 years 49,413 photos $500 59.5 photos per day 1.01¢ per photo
Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 105,067 photos $570 78.8 photos per day 0.54¢ per photo
+$250 repair cost 0.78¢ per photo
106,916 shutter releases $570 80.15 shutter releases per day 0.533¢ per shutter release
+$250 repair cost 0.77¢ per shutter release
Samsung SL30 July 27, 2009 – December 1, 2016 2684 days; 7.35 years 21,616 photos $70 8.05 photos per day 0.32¢ per photo
Nikon D90 February 26, 2010 – November 30, 2018 3199 days; 8.76 years 208,699 photos $780 65.24 photos per day 0.37¢ per photo
289,872 shutter releases 90.61 shutter releases per day 0.27¢ per shutter release
iPhone 5 June 23, 2013 – December 23, 2014 548 days; 1.5 years 130 photos $0
(Provided by work)
0.24 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
149 shutter releases 0.27 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
iPhone 6 Plus January 8, 2015 – January 11, 2018 1099 days; 3.01 years 4883 photos $0
(Provided by work)
4.44 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
23,352 shutter releases 21.25 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
Nikon D7100
(Current)
December 2, 2015 – October 22, 2020 1786 days; 4.89 years 31,807 photos $620 17.81 photos per day 1.95¢ per photo
87,751 shutter releases 49.13 shutter releases per day 0.71¢ per shutter release
iPod Touch 6
(Current)
December 2, 2017 – May 24, 2019 538 days; 1.47 years 5021 photos $160 9.33 photos per day 3.18¢ per photo
57,515 shutter releases 106.91 shutter releases per day 0.28¢ per shutter release
iPhone 8 Plus
(Current)
March 8, 2018 – October 22, 2020 959 days; 2.62 years 17,410 photos $0
(Provided by work)
18.15 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
249,007 shutter releases 259.65 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release

I added the 0th photo to the 25k photo table. We haven’t hit 475k yet, but we’re now on 692 days with another 5k-ish photos to go before hitting 475k. I blame the quarantine.

0 25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000
October 6, 2000 January 12, 2004 October 20, 2004 April 10, 2006 April 20, 2007 December 4, 2007
1193 days 282 days 537 days 375 days 228 days
125,000 150,000 175,000 200,000 225,000 250,000
December 4, 2007 February 7, 2009 July 4, 2009 April 14, 2010 September 4, 2010 June 23, 2011
431 days 147 days 284 days 143 days 292 days
250,000 275,000 300,000 325,000 350,000 375,000
June 23, 2011 December 23, 2011 August 24, 2012 June 2, 2013 February 17, 2014 March 21, 2015
183 days 245 days 282 days 260 days 397 days
375,000 400,000 425,000 450,000
March 21, 2015 November 13, 2015 April 29, 2017 December 2, 2018
237 days 533 days 582 days

And it’s graph time. First, number of photos taken by month, log scale y-axis:

Same thing but with a linear y-axis (second graph is since 2010):

Total number of photos taken through time (second graph is since 2010):

And amount of time between 1000 photos (second graph is since 2010, starting at 187,000):

The pandemic is really causing craziness, which I suppose shouldn’t too unsurprising. We have a bit of a photo spike in Feburary (Thailand for dad’s funeral) followed by a plummet as everything shut down.

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