Photo Stats (Finally)

Well, this post has been a *long* time coming. Thanks to the pandemic (and six [!] months of double-digit photos, including January and February 2021 with 19 and 18 photos), it’s taken three years (!) to take 25,000 photos and hit the next milestone of 475,000 photos.

We finally hit it yesterday, thanks to an impromptu Pittsburgh visit by Karl, featuring the second day in a row of long walks (10 miles yesterday, probably like 5 miles the previous day).

So… first up is the (full) camera stats table, this time featuring a new work phone (iPhone 12). (We had a couple new photos with the D90, but it’s not in regular use, so I’m keeping it in retired status despite it being usable.)

Intel Pocket PC camera October 6, 2000 – September 18, 2003 1077 days; 2.95 years 15,829 photos $200 14.7 photos per day 1.26¢ per photo
Olympus C3000 Zoom September 28, 2001 – December 5, 2003 798 days; 2.186 years 10,647 photos $450 13.3 photos per day 4.23¢ per photo
Kodak Easyshare DX6490 December 8, 2003 – March 17, 2006 830 days; 2.274 years 49,413 photos $500 59.5 photos per day 1.01¢ per photo
Nikon D50 March 22, 2006 – November 15, 2009 1334 days; 3.655 years 105,067 photos $570 78.8 photos per day 0.54¢ per photo
+$250 repair cost 0.78¢ per photo
106,916 shutter releases $570 80.15 shutter releases per day 0.533¢ per shutter release
+$250 repair cost 0.77¢ per shutter release
Samsung SL30 July 27, 2009 – December 1, 2016 2684 days; 7.35 years 21,616 photos $70 8.05 photos per day 0.32¢ per photo
Nikon D90 February 26, 2010 – July 23, 2021 4165 days; 11.4 years 208,718 photos $780 50.11 photos per day 0.37¢ per photo
290,005 shutter releases 69.63 shutter releases per day 0.27¢ per shutter release
iPhone 5 June 23, 2013 – December 23, 2014 548 days; 1.5 years 130 photos $0
(Provided by work)
0.24 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
149 shutter releases 0.27 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
iPhone 6 Plus January 8, 2015 – January 11, 2018 1099 days; 3.01 years 4883 photos $0
(Provided by work)
4.44 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
23,352 shutter releases 21.25 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
Nikon D7100
(Current)
December 2, 2015 – December 5, 2021 2195 days; 6.01 years 34,064 photos $620 15.52 photos per day 1.82¢ per photo
94,082 shutter releases 42.86 shutter releases per day 0.66¢ per shutter release
iPod Touch 6
(Current)
December 2, 2017 – December 4, 2021 1463 days; 4.01 years 5605 photos $160 3.83 photos per day 2.85¢ per photo
66,387 shutter releases 45.38 shutter releases per day 0.24¢ per shutter release
iPhone 8 Plus March 8, 2018 – March 21, 2021 1109 days; 3.04 years 17,751 photos $0
(Provided by work)
16.01 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
252,264 shutter releases 227.47 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release
iPhone 12
(Current)
March 26, 2021 – December 5, 2021 254 days; 0.7 years 1114 photos $0
(Provided by work)
4.39 photos per day 0.00¢ per photo
9941 shutter releases 39.14 shutter releases per day 0.00¢ per shutter release

Here’s the first photo taken with the iPhone 12:

And here’s the 475,000th photo (incidentally also taken with the iPhone 12):

Here’s the photo counts table. Thanks, pandemic.

0 25,000 50,000 75,000 100,000 125,000
October 6, 2000 January 12, 2004 October 20, 2004 April 10, 2006 April 20, 2007 December 4, 2007
1193 days 282 days 537 days 375 days 228 days
125,000 150,000 175,000 200,000 225,000 250,000
December 4, 2007 February 7, 2009 July 4, 2009 April 14, 2010 September 4, 2010 June 23, 2011
431 days 147 days 284 days 143 days 292 days
250,000 275,000 300,000 325,000 350,000 375,000
June 23, 2011 December 23, 2011 August 24, 2012 June 2, 2013 February 17, 2014 March 21, 2015
183 days 245 days 282 days 260 days 397 days
375,000 400,000 425,000 450,000 475,000
March 21, 2015 November 13, 2015 April 29, 2017 December 2, 2018 December 5, 2021
237 days 533 days 582 days 1099 days

And the usual graphs, starting with photos by month over time, log scale y-axis:

The same thing, but with a linear scale y-axis (full timescale versus 2010 onward):

Total number of photos taken over time (full timescale versus 2010 onward):

And time between 1000 photos (full timescale versus 2010 onward):

Those pandemic spikes on the graphs are unsurprising, but still unfortunate.

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