Ugh

The most common, widely publicized conflicts have involved pharmacists who refuse to fill prescriptions for birth control pills, morning-after pills and other forms of contraception. They say they believe that such methods can cause what amounts to an abortion and that the contraceptives promote promiscuity, divorce, the spread of sexually transmitted diseases and other societal woes.

You have your beliefs, fine, but once those beliefs start getting in the way of you doing your job you need to find different work. It is not okay to force the job (especially if it directly impacts customers) to adapt to you.
If you are paid to dispense drugs at a pharmacy, you had better dispense those drugs when someone comes to you with a prescription and you have that drug in stock. Don’t impose your twisted morals on other people.

This seems like a good idea… having pharmacies that don’t carry and sell them in the first place. That way this problem doesn’t come up.

The pharmacies are emerging at a time when a variety of health-care workers are refusing to perform medical procedures they find objectionable. Fertility doctors have refused to inseminate gay women. Ambulance drivers have refused to transport patients for abortions. Anesthesiologists have refused to assist in sterilizations.

This pisses me off so much.

Ugh… I feel like many of the problems with society today stem from religion (or the misuse of such).

3 thoughts on “Ugh

  1. I heard about this on the radio this morning. I didn’t read the article, but from what they said on the radio, they are popping up in many places, but there is no way to tell whether or not the pharmacy is pro-life or not… no sign or sticker in the window or anything like that. I don’t know exactly how true that is, but I think there should be some way to identify whether or not the pharmacy you’re about to enter will give you what you need or not.

  2. At risk of…whatever, and as a girl who is on the pill, I’m going to defend the pharmacists on this. You can’t force any other storekeeper to sell things he believes are morally objectionable, so why should pharmacists have to? Consumers have the right to take their business elsewhere, but pharmacists have the right to choose what prescriptions to fill.

    If the store stocks and sells such drugs and an employee refuses to fill a prescription, then that store is well within its rights to fire that employee, of course. That sort of behavior is not protected and hurts business.

    I feel like people have a right to refuse to perform any action they are uncomfortable with for any reason. They also have the right to get their asses fired if in this way they become a liability to their employer.

  3. You can’t force any other storekeeper to sell things he believes are morally objectionable, so why should pharmacists have to?
    Because pharmacists are hired by the store to sell the drugs that the store sells.
    Yes, if they refuse to do so, they should quit or be fired.

    It’s one thing if the store itself refuses to sell things that are morally objectionable (which is fine) and another if an employee of the store refuses (which then means he is not performing his job).

    If you work at a hardware store (as an employee) do you have a right to refuse to sell lumber because you believe in the preservation of forests? No.
    If you work in the military do you have a right to refuse to learn to use a gun? No.
    If you work at a supermarket’s meat counter do you have a right to refuse to sell beef because you believe cows are sacred? No.

    So no, I don’t think pharmacists have the right to choose what prescriptions to fill. Either you take the job knowing the store sells things that you’re opposed to (and it’s your responsibility to ask) or you don’t take the job and find somewhere else to work more in-line with your beliefs.

    Which is to say, I guess, fine if a pharmacist refuses to sell contraceptives, but they should not complain (or, worse, sue) when they lose their job as a result.
    Freedom of religion does not mean freedom from performing your job duties which you agreed to when you were hired.

    If the store stocks and sells such drugs and an employee refuses to fill a prescription, then that store is well within its rights to fire that employee, of course. That sort of behavior is not protected and hurts business.
    I feel like we’re saying the same thing. My issue is with people who do this, are fired, and then have an issue with this claiming that their rights were violated or something (and with laws actually protecting people who do this from retaliation such as firing).

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