Breaking all the things

It’s been an interesting few days in life… mostly full of things not working properly and/or frustratingly.

On Monday, I set about installing the latest Windows 10 updates on my desktop. Apparently one of the updates was a large enough change that it caused Photoshop to require re-activation. Which wouldn’t be a real problem, except that Adobe took down the CS3 activation servers earlier this year. The workaround was to download a version of Photoshop that didn’t require online activation (from the official Adobe website; which required installing some software to download it, too) and obtain a new offline serial number.
So that process was reasonably straightforward, but when I went through the uninstall/reinstall process… it failed. The newly installed version continued to request re-activation, rather than activation, and wouldn’t give me a way to use the new offline serial number.
In the end, I found the solution on their forums (clear some cache directory on your computer) and was able to get Photoshop working again.

Except the process of clearing the cache screwed up my installation of Photoshop Elements (which I use for the Organizer functionality for my photos). Fixing that required another uninstall and reinstall of Photoshop Elements, which fortunately was uneventful. (I was a little worried about the photo library database file.) Still, it’s a great example of why DRM only hurts legitimate consumers of your product: People that have always been using a cracked version of CS3 would never have run into problems due to the activation server EoL. People that bought it have to jump through hoops to get a new installer and get things working again.

On Tuesday, I did laundry. And some felt ring in the dryer came unattached, and is no longer part of the dryer. We’re trying to figure out how much it matters, and if we should care enough that we should get it fixed before using the dryer again. But that’s just even more of a mess to deal with.

We drove to my in-laws’ for Thanksgiving on Wednesday. It was our first time trying to use our new EZ Pass on the Ohio toll roads… so of course, when we go to drive through the toll gate to enter the turnpike, the system is broken. They give us a “breakdown ticket” instead, but then when we got off the turnpike, the gate just opened to let us through, and the tollbooth attendant seemed uninterested in collecting the ticket. So we were concerned about getting charged the correct amount until the charge registered on the account (which only happened today, and fortunately registered correctly). So boo for technology.

Yesterday (or, more accurately, early this morning) was Black Friday sales, starting at some time around midnight. I tend to save up a list of the things I want to buy during a year, and get them while they’re on sale. (Persona 5 for $30!) I collected together my list, saw that almost everything on my list was on sale at Best Buy (because I guess Black Friday deals are mostly the same across all retailers now and Best Buy stocks all the stuff?), and patiently waited for the deals to become active on the site. They finally did around 1 AM and then… the site crashed. It was mostly unresponsive, I was unable to add items to my cart, and the checkout process glitched out many times (fortunately, always before asking for credit card information). I ended up waiting for the deals to become active on Amazon instead (which took until ~3 AM), and getting them there, but it was unnecessarily frustrating. Websites that expect to host Black Friday deals online really should be better at handling the server load of Black Friday deals.
Mostly cranky about this because it meant I got two hours less sleep than I would have, and because I’m particularly wishing I had just slept normally and tried to buy things the next morning. Next year, perhaps, this shall be the plan.

Finally, today I tried to log in to Facebook (to check messages, which is really the only thing I use FB for anymore)… and ran into their latest and greatest form of two factor: Apparently the new method gives you the names of five of your friends (randomly selected, it looks like?), and requires you to either call three of them (or talk to them in person), and have them go to a page to obtain a 4-digit code for you to enter. I was fortunate in my case that I actually have the ability to contact any of them (albeit indirectly, in some cases, via a friend who actually has their contact information), but I really wonder what would happen if three of the five were people you knew mostly (or entirely) indirectly, or only extremely casually. Would you just lose the ability to access your account forever? I kind of feel like this process was not thought through very well.
It’s also particularly amusing, or perhaps heavy-handed, when a person you contact actually goes to get a code… it asks them to confirm how they talked to you (over the phone, email/text, or not at all). I understand the desire for security, and as someone that builds two-factor mechanisms for work appreciate the innovation, but this particular method seems perhaps a bit too unforgiving. It seems particularly rough given that a lot of people can *only* be contacted on FB messenger these days, but it mostly just reminds me why I hate closed systems and stopped using Facebook in the first place. (Now if I could only contact everyone I needed to via email…)

So, as nice as the holiday has been, it’s generally been a frustrating week. Hopefully everyone had a nice Thanksgiving, though. :)

One thought on “Breaking all the things

  1. I’ve had some of that “EVERYTHING SEEMS BROKEN” feeling recently too, but happily for me, that is followed by a feeling of “Everything is getting fixed”, which feels much nicer.

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