Dryer, Water, Gingerbread

Our dryer adventures have concluded with a successful self repair, after an appliance service quoted $180 for someone to come out. We ended up not quite having to take the entire dryer apart… instead, we were able to glue the new seal on while the drum was sitting mostly in place (which meant we didn’t have to unhook any of the belts… huzzah).

The repair was completed just in time for the huge water main servicing our area to break, leaving us with minimal (and contaminated) water, foiling my plans to deal with all the laundry stacking up. Instead, we went out to investigate, and found some impressive remnants of the breakage.


Other than that, life has been going. I’m officially done with work for the year. After we got reasonable water back, I spent most of my first day off (Monday) doing 6 loads of laundry while sitting and playing Persona 5 in the basement to make sure the dryer didn’t catch fire. It seems to have worked properly, which is good.

Persona 5, by the way, is a pretty amazing game. I think the visual novel/relationship elements are integrated really well with the RPG elements. I’ve been kind of obsessed with it, and hoping to finish up the fifth palace soon!

Our neighbors had an ugly sweater party with gingerbread house making, so I tried my hand at making a gingerbread house. It didn’t turn out too badly, I think?





In any case, Christmas soon approaches, which will be nice. I’ve updated my photo journal given the free time I’ve been having. It’s nice having time off to catch up on errands and chores.

Breaking all the things

It’s been an interesting few days in life… mostly full of things not working properly and/or frustratingly.

On Monday, I set about installing the latest Windows 10 updates on my desktop. Apparently one of the updates was a large enough change that it caused Photoshop to require re-activation. Which wouldn’t be a real problem, except that Adobe took down the CS3 activation servers earlier this year. The workaround was to download a version of Photoshop that didn’t require online activation (from the official Adobe website; which required installing some software to download it, too) and obtain a new offline serial number.
So that process was reasonably straightforward, but when I went through the uninstall/reinstall process… it failed. The newly installed version continued to request re-activation, rather than activation, and wouldn’t give me a way to use the new offline serial number.
In the end, I found the solution on their forums (clear some cache directory on your computer) and was able to get Photoshop working again.

Except the process of clearing the cache screwed up my installation of Photoshop Elements (which I use for the Organizer functionality for my photos). Fixing that required another uninstall and reinstall of Photoshop Elements, which fortunately was uneventful. (I was a little worried about the photo library database file.) Still, it’s a great example of why DRM only hurts legitimate consumers of your product: People that have always been using a cracked version of CS3 would never have run into problems due to the activation server EoL. People that bought it have to jump through hoops to get a new installer and get things working again.

On Tuesday, I did laundry. And some felt ring in the dryer came unattached, and is no longer part of the dryer. We’re trying to figure out how much it matters, and if we should care enough that we should get it fixed before using the dryer again. But that’s just even more of a mess to deal with.

We drove to my in-laws’ for Thanksgiving on Wednesday. It was our first time trying to use our new EZ Pass on the Ohio toll roads… so of course, when we go to drive through the toll gate to enter the turnpike, the system is broken. They give us a “breakdown ticket” instead, but then when we got off the turnpike, the gate just opened to let us through, and the tollbooth attendant seemed uninterested in collecting the ticket. So we were concerned about getting charged the correct amount until the charge registered on the account (which only happened today, and fortunately registered correctly). So boo for technology.

Yesterday (or, more accurately, early this morning) was Black Friday sales, starting at some time around midnight. I tend to save up a list of the things I want to buy during a year, and get them while they’re on sale. (Persona 5 for $30!) I collected together my list, saw that almost everything on my list was on sale at Best Buy (because I guess Black Friday deals are mostly the same across all retailers now and Best Buy stocks all the stuff?), and patiently waited for the deals to become active on the site. They finally did around 1 AM and then… the site crashed. It was mostly unresponsive, I was unable to add items to my cart, and the checkout process glitched out many times (fortunately, always before asking for credit card information). I ended up waiting for the deals to become active on Amazon instead (which took until ~3 AM), and getting them there, but it was unnecessarily frustrating. Websites that expect to host Black Friday deals online really should be better at handling the server load of Black Friday deals.
Mostly cranky about this because it meant I got two hours less sleep than I would have, and because I’m particularly wishing I had just slept normally and tried to buy things the next morning. Next year, perhaps, this shall be the plan.

Finally, today I tried to log in to Facebook (to check messages, which is really the only thing I use FB for anymore)… and ran into their latest and greatest form of two factor: Apparently the new method gives you the names of five of your friends (randomly selected, it looks like?), and requires you to either call three of them (or talk to them in person), and have them go to a page to obtain a 4-digit code for you to enter. I was fortunate in my case that I actually have the ability to contact any of them (albeit indirectly, in some cases, via a friend who actually has their contact information), but I really wonder what would happen if three of the five were people you knew mostly (or entirely) indirectly, or only extremely casually. Would you just lose the ability to access your account forever? I kind of feel like this process was not thought through very well.
It’s also particularly amusing, or perhaps heavy-handed, when a person you contact actually goes to get a code… it asks them to confirm how they talked to you (over the phone, email/text, or not at all). I understand the desire for security, and as someone that builds two-factor mechanisms for work appreciate the innovation, but this particular method seems perhaps a bit too unforgiving. It seems particularly rough given that a lot of people can *only* be contacted on FB messenger these days, but it mostly just reminds me why I hate closed systems and stopped using Facebook in the first place. (Now if I could only contact everyone I needed to via email…)

So, as nice as the holiday has been, it’s generally been a frustrating week. Hopefully everyone had a nice Thanksgiving, though. :)

Strict Koenigs-Pittsburgh Hike, Attempt Two

A bridge was out, so we made another attempt at a constructive proof of the Koenigs-Pittsburgh bridge problem yesterday. We were joined by Keith, Dan, Christian, and Edward, and dutifully set off on our 27 mile hike to cross every pedestrian-navigable trans-three-river bridge with both endpoints in Pittsburgh. The first one, of course, was the furthest, taking almost 7 miles to get to, and a further 4 to the next bridge.



We, however, found ourselves foiled at our attempts to cross the Liberty Bridge, as the pedestrian walkway was closed due to bridge construction, and the detour signs led to the Smithfield bridge. We decided to also skip the 10th street bridge (which was a bit of a detour anyway, on the original route), and instead skip to the Smithfield, putting us downtown at a better lunch time anyway.

I skipped out after lunch with Keith (who had somewhere to be) due to not feeling so great. I probably could have finished the entire thing (only a total of 25 miles, at that point, thanks to the changes), but I think I’m much happier having dropped out after ~15 of those. I think the lesson, though, is that I need to buy inserts for my shoes… I think the default ones that come with them now distribute weight weirdly and make the back of my knees hurt after a lot of walking.

Steve apparently joined the group after lunch, and they succeeded at the rest of the walk. So even though the proof failed due to two bridges being out, it was still a good experience.

More photos, as always, are at photos.

Have a Bar-B-Cone:

In non-hike news, we went to the library today for the afternoon, and I read this book. Really enjoyed it, and I think it’d be really interesting if there was a Machine-of-Death style compilation of stories for it in terms of how the world is affected by the ability to capture and restore peoples’ “souls”.

Phoenix, Wedding, Life

Life goes. I was in Phoenix for my friend’s wedding last week, and also took a trip to the Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument with my parents.



(I also lost my lens cap at the wedding, somehow. Oh well.)

Also got to catch up with David, Matt, Isaac, and Janet, which was fun.

Trip photos, as usual, are at photos.

The most interesting part, though, was probably the flight back. Got to the airport around 10 for a noon flight, and got an error from the Southwest checkin kiosks that I couldn’t check bags more than 4 hours before the flight time. Turns out my plane was coming from Burbank, and the Oakland to Burbank leg had been rerouted to Las Vegas due to weather in Burbank. (The list of flights for that airport was just a mess of rerouting that morning, so that was fun.)
My parents wanted to go walk or do something else instead in the meantime, given the flight was scheduled for 2 (and then 2:30) PM, but I figured I’d go sit at the gate anyway. So I do that, and then I notice a while later that the flight was once again on time for noon.
Turns out they were getting a plane from a hangar instead of waiting for the Burbank plane, so we were all getting ready to board… and then the flight changed to 1:15 instead (I guess they had paperwork for the plane that needed to be completed). And then it showed on time again.
I have a series of emails in my inbox from Southwest for the 5 (!) schedule changes for the flight, which were basically jumping back and forth between the original noon time and other times between 1 and 2:30. Not sure why they couldn’t do the updates in a more reasonable way, but whatever.

Otherwise, not much has been happening. We had probably around 160 or 170 trick-or-treaters yesterday (we left the bowl of candy out after 151, passed a few groups of trick-or-treaters heading to our street, and then found the bowl empty an hour later), which is a bit of a reduction from last year’s ~200. I guess the colder weather this year had some effect, although maybe not as much as we were originally expecting.

Also there was more karaoke, which is always fun.

Life, Sleep, and Games

Life goes, and feels like it’s mostly been consumed by work lately. It’s not that work has gotten particularly busier or more difficult than usual, but I’ve found myself having a really stressful time with it anyway. I think a lot of it is probably due to my increased (really, changed) responsibilities and I start overseeing different areas and products from a technical standpoint more than actually embedding within a team and generating code output. When I do end up coding, it’s usually been for either weird things that no one else wants to touch, or cleanup work that is pretty mind-numbing.
I guess we’ll see how things are looking and feeling after this release is over, but it’s been utterly bizarre to no longer be writing code every day, and having solid meeting days become a more frequent occurrence.

In other (perhaps related) news, I’ve been having a lot of trouble sleeping lately. I’m not entirely sure why, since I have no trouble falling asleep during the day if I want to take a nap. But at night, as I lay in bed, it seems there’s just endless thoughts and ideas and concerns that fill my head all at the same time, and I can’t clear my head enough to actually doze off. Often, when I do sleep, I find myself waking up randomly in the middle of the night and then unable to fall back asleep for hours, if at all.
This is a pretty recent problem, and it seems to coincide pretty well with my generally feeling increased stress levels at work, so we’ll see if things get better once we finish this release.

In non-work news, and in terms of things consuming most of my non-work time, I’ve been working on a game. This isn’t particularly new news, given I’ve been working on this game since something like February of this year, but it’s recently become a bit more of a time sink as it’s finished to the point of being playable and I’ve started hiring artists and putting polish onto it. It’s not something I feel comfortable sharing with the world at large yet, but I’ve learned a lot of really interesting things from doing it.

My main takeaways are that I’m really, really appreciating having a well-paying day job, and that I really wish I had any artistic talent whatsoever so I could try my hand at doing at least some of this myself. Also I wish I was filthy rich so I could just finance a bunch of awesome artists to create art unrelated to anything I was doing, because that stuff is hard, yo.
It really feels to me like pretty much anyone can code (especially given how important it’s become, in a lot of ways, now), but very few people can art well, which is only amplified by the fact that the engine I’m using (RenPy) makes it extremely easy for anyone to write a game with basically zero coding ability. The people that seem to make the best games on it seem to be people that can draw sprites and backgrounds and CGs, rather than people that can code.

In other, unrelated news, my second daily photo project ended yesterday. It had long since run its course, and I often found myself going downstairs and taking pictures of the stove or something. Still, I managed to do a daily photo for over a year, which is a pretty nice thing.

This has become a wall of text, so here’s some photos.